In the Beginning We Were Just a Boy and Girl

WRITING  WEDNESDAY

It’s Writing Wednesday, and today’s prompt is to write about meeting your husband, significant other.

I spent yesterday at the hospital while my son had a procedure. The day conjured up memories of when his dad was ill and in the hospital. Not memories I want to dwell on. So why not go all the way back to when it began? When we met.

IN THE BEGINNING

We were both students at Murray State College. He was in his second year and I just started. My family had moved back to Oklahoma a few weeks earlier. For that and a variety of other reasons I stayed at the college most weekend. He went home unless he was working.

The first time I saw him was a Friday afternoon. I Peered over the partition separating the line of waiting students from those seated and eating, I looked for friends to join.

“No one here.” I glanced to see the owner of the deep timber voice and smiled at what I saw.

“Nope.” Just us two, I agreed.

We proceeded to get our food and join our respective friends, who were actually in the cafeteria.

A few days later I saw him again. Once more in the cafeteria. This time he was in the kitchen putting things away. When he saw me he grinned and began acting goofy. I laughed at his antics.

“Anybody know that cute guy working in the kitchen?” I asked when I joined my friends.

“Yeah, that’s David.” Someone said.

“Do you know him? Can you introduce us? What’s his last name?” I rattled off my questions.

“Yeah, I know him. Sure, I can introduce you. I’m not sure about his last name, it’s Bosure or something. French I think.”

THE MEETING

A few days later she did introduce us, in a way. Several of us girls were playing with a Frisbee in the parking lot. In case  you don’t know, a Frisbee is a round plastic disk that is thrown and caught, or in our case, dropped. She threw it into the open door to the boys dormitory.

All four of us went to retrieve it. Several guys were sitting in the lobby area watching television. She invited the guys to come play with us, they declined. However, she did convince them to show us their dorm rooms, as though they’d be any different from ours.

Her ploy worked and a group of us, boys and girls traipsed down the hall to check out a couple of the cleaner rooms. When we headed back to the lobby area she managed to shepherd everyone ahead of David and I so we were left alone at the back of the pack.

We stayed together that day, and for 35 years.

At our daughter’s wedding reception, 34 years after meeting.

By the way, I later learned his last name was Beshear, and we aren’t sure if it’s French or German.

How did you meet your significant other?

Did you like him the first time you saw him?

Do you have a favorite memory from the meeting?

 

 

 

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Widow Fighting for Justice for her Deceased Husband and Others

 

Finding a new normal. Creating a new life. Both are part of a widow’s reality. What happens when the past can’t stay in the past? What happens when the widow must repeatedly revisit the time of her husband’s death? Can we help her?

cheryl-cole-canderlesei-holding-pic-of-david-cole
via Cincinnati Enquirer

That is the reality for Cheryl Cole-Candeleresi, Cincinnati, Ohio. She’d been married only two years to her high school sweetheart, David Cole, when he was murdered in 1974. Two men were convicted and sentenced to death for the murder of the police officer and National Guardsman, making Cheryl a widow.

In the late seventies, the Ohio Supreme Court ruled the Ohio death penalty unconstitutional. At that time, all those Ohio inmates who had been sentenced to death had their sentences commuted. Since Ohio did not have a “life sentence without parole” option then, the men automatically became eligible for parole hearings.

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http://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2017/02/08/wife-slain-cincinnati-officer-s-always-my-mind/97647424/

  The first time the men convicted of killing the police officer came up for parole, no one from David Cole’s family, the police department, or the prosecution’s office was notified. Because Cheryl didn’t know about the hearing, she didn’t testify, and with 50 letters sent in on behalf of the first man, he was released. Later the Supreme Court simply said that a mistake had been made in not notifying those concerned with the case.

Once Cole’s widow, learned about the parole hearing and the first man’s release, she began her campaign to keep the other man behind bars. Every few years she has to repeat the process.

When an inmate has a hearing and parole is denied, the board must then set a timeline for the next appeal. The longest time allowed is ten years.

The last time the inmate came up for parole; over 9000 letters were sent in urging the parole be denied. In addition, Cheryl and others testified in person. Retired Police Lieutenant Steve Kramer believes the more letters the parole board receives, the more likely the convicted man will stay behind bars and have his length of time before the next hearing extended. Cheryl and others will testify before the parole board on February 13 and his hearing will be in March.

She has remarried, has children and grandchildren. She said, “I’m lucky to have a family that supports me through all of this.”

To help support Cole-Candeleresi and the police of Ohio, go to the parole board page http://www.hcpros.org/inmate/roland-reaves?modal=true&iid=A14082700&parole=Roland_A._Reaves,  and leave a comment encouraging the parole board to both deny his parole, and give him another ten years before he can apply again. As Cheryl Cole-Candeleresi said, “we need justice for David and safety for everyone else.”

 

 

 

Here I usually ask my readers to leave a comment with their opinions. However, today, I’m urging you to go to the website above, before February 13, and encourage the Ohio parole board to deny this man’s release.

 

 

 

The original story can be found here: http://www.fox19.com/story/34418885/fallen-officers-widow-wants-convicted-killer-to-stay-behind-bars